Posts Tagged ‘entertainment’

Digication: The synergy between Digital Signage and Location

June 17th, 2011

Digital signs are polluting cities globally and the only thing consumers’ want is to see their faces and words hitting the big screen. Be it a childhood dream or an item off the bucket list, having yourself plastered in Times Square or Piccadilly Circus would have topped the list every time. But how can you make this happen? It is of common belief that those signs are saved for America’s Next Top Model, not ordinary folk like us.  Truth be told, America’s Next Top Model is you! Within the digital sign industry, it is becoming possible to broadcast yourself or items that are targeted toward you on the jazzy displays.

LocaModa  + Foursquare do Vegas

LocaModa wanted to bring visualizations to place based media. Their first effort was to team up with Foursquare at a specific location and whoever checks in will be displayed on the digital signage outside. The sign would also display photos of the mayor, check ins and comments about the location. Users could even upload photos of their experience within that location and potentially have it display on the big screen. In doing so, consumers can display what they’re doing, when they’re doing and how they’re doing it to their friends though Foursquare but to upwards of 100K strangers walking past the sign. Who would complain with those 15 seconds of fame?

AdCentricity does Consumer Sync

AdCentricity teamed up with Environics to develop a solution for DOOH media to target consumers based on their behaviours, psychographics and purchase intent. The Nielson Company develops the consumer profiles so that companies can target their consumers based on their preferences, media habits and lifestyles within their marketplaces. Consumer Sync will engage with customers through DOOH media in a more impactful and personal way than has been seen before. How does this impact location? Well, Consumer Sync allows companies to develop media based on the demographics within a given geographic region, which ultimately enables creative distribution and flighting.  AdCentricity is the first of its kind to utilize targeting analytics as a way of developing advertising campaigns. They have opened the doors to an avenue with great potential.

One of the best examples I’ve seen to date is the recent project by McDonald’s Sweden that put an interactive billboard in Stureplan, the main public square of Stockholm. Called “Pick n Play”, the concept was dead simple: For one week (May 7-14) consumers competed by completing a pong-like game in 30 seconds on the billboard. Winners received coupons sent immediately to their mobile device for free food in the nearest McDonald’s restaurant.  WATCH VIDEO HERE:  McDonald’s Pick n Play

The big news here is as the user you play right from their mobile web browser, with no app to download!

Digital signs aren’t just the flashy lights anymore. They are based on strategy, creativeness and location. Companies are able to make the messages on these screens personal with script written by passing by patrons or photos uploaded to social media sites. The LocaModa and Foursquare have taken checking in at locations from being something that you share with your friends to being broadcasted on the big screens for everyone to see. Now when a 4sq user becomes mayor they will feel a greater sense of elation as their picture will be in the posted beside Gap’s latest campaign. Furthermore, AdCentricity has removed the meaningless nature of visual displays and made them more personal. Any message on their screens is personalized and targeted to that demographic and most of the time it will apply to you. This only leaves one question: what’s next? Will digital displays pair with the geolocation software in phones and tablets to directly target those consumers as they walk by? Will campaigns use augmented reality so that you are the ad? Really at this point, anything is possible. Just make sure you hit the gym because rumor has it screens make you look 10 lbs heavier.

Making The Unsocial Social

May 31st, 2011

When A Place Is Not A Place

The New Directions are heading to nationals in NYC on Glee and a group of girls are comically preparing for the wedding of the decade in Bridesmaids. Popping bubble wrap and hitting green lights in row are amongst 1000 pleasures in life described in Neil Pasricha’s The Book of Awesome. Love songs and ballads are penetrating the ears of listeners as British gem, Adele, hits the top on global music charts. Seems like a lot is going on in the entertainment industry, but do we have all the stickers to prove it?

Traditionally, paperbacks in comfy chairs or classic films on the couch while wrapped in blankets accompany rainy days. TV has been a mindless pass time for as long as Bob Barker hosted the Price as Right. Now all the activities that your introverted side associated with have gone online and become social. No need to panic and hide in the closet clutching your weathered collection of Harry Potter, platforms are now available for you to discuss your potion concoctions and Quidditch tactics with other muggles online.

Platforms like GetGlue, Miso and Philo provide viewers with enhanced interaction with their favourite forms of entertainment. This allows networks, publishers and film studios to build relationships with their consumers by rewarding them with stickers or other tangible prizes and encourage further usage. TV studios utilize these platforms to encourage live viewing and consistency as certain episodes unlock other rewards.  GetGlue has evolved into the leader of this booming space with users surpassing 1M and check-ins exceeding 12M. Users can check-in through their website or mobile Apps (available on iPhone and Android, sorry BB users!) to identify that they are watching, reading or listening to items. In doing so, users will receive stickers or badges and sometimes be entered to win tangible prices. Furthermore, there is the option for users to comment and like pieces as they would over crumpets at their book club.

As marketers within the entertainment industry, how can we use this to reach our target audience or even just to have one of those nifty stickers? Networks have already launched successful (and somewhat adhesive) campaigns.

CBC’s Hockey Night in Canada Gets Glue’d

For Canadians (like myself), hockey is part of the culture and suits worn by Don Cherry had become socially accepted and respected. CBC’s Hockey Night in Canada teamed up with GetGlue to make exclusive stickers that are available to users when they check in at games. This campaign was launched during game 7 of Montreal vs. Boston with exclusive sports-related stickers. Now onto the semifinals, let’s just hope that Canada comes out strong to make these stickers worth it. Go Canucks!

Miso let’s Viewers Pick ‘Em

Although Donald Trump is a leading business magnate, his luscious blond locks don’t always allow him to make the right decisions on Apprentice. Seeing as reality shows are something that cannot be missed because of the fear of overhearing the outcome during your commute to work the following day. Miso is allowing viewers to participate during the living viewing, to step in and make the decision for Mr. Trump. Unfortunately, this poll will have no bearing on the results of the show but it does encourage user engagement and allows viewers to interact with each other in real time. So, next time you’re watching Dancing with the Stars, log on to Miso and share who you think should move on: Kirstie Alley or the Situation. “None of the above” isn’t an option.

You Again, Philo!

Prior to the premiere of the movie, You Again, Philo launched a campaign offering the chance to win a $500 spa package grand prize among smaller prices like memorabilia and free tickets. To be entered in the draw, users had to check in a minimum of 3 different times to shows that aired a You Again commercial. If the user went on to comment “you again” on any of the qualifying shows they would be entered to win the grand prize. Not bad for a lazy Sunday on the couch.

GetGlue and others have broken ground in a whole new space. They have developed a platform that works like Foursquare but the users don’t have to leave the comfort of their own home. ‘Checking In’ is no longer limited to actual places, but virtual ones too. In doing so, GetGlue has reached an entirely new market, formally known as the couch potatoes and bookworms. Going forward, you should remove the tarnished pins from your old canvas rucksack because it’s all about stickers now!

Why Media & Entertainment Companies Need LBS

June 14th, 2010

As I sit at the beautiful Fairmont Banff Springs Hotel attending the NextMedia/Banff World Television Festival, I can’t help but think about the huge opportunity in front of media and entertainment companies when it comes to location-based services.

Already, we are seeing early signs of deals with companies like MyTown, FourSquare and GoWalla.

The Travel Channel has found early success with its MyTown application to the tune of 17 million check-ins in one month, while FourSquare has struck partnerships with media companies such as HBO, Warner Brothers, MTV and Bravo.

And the phenomenon is not limited to just television,

Concert promoters are jumping on board as well, as events such as Bonnaroo, Coachella and Lollapalooza are all using mobile apps to enhance the concert experience for attendees as part of a broader new-media push that also includes social media, LBS and other broad Internet initiatives to co-exist.

Many of these apps are also integrated with Twitter and Facebook.  In the music business, it’s all about improving the fan experience while at the event, and then finding ways to extend the experience into an ongoing relationship long after the event or concert is over.

At the recent forum hosted by Future of Local Media during Internet Week NY, several questions around the concept of the value of geo-location and LBS were explored.

Ian Spalter, Executive Creative Director of Mobile & Emerging Platforms at R/GA, believes that this opportunity forces brands to consider not only how they are relevant to a consumer’s life, but also when and where they are relevant.  Mark Ghuneim, CEO of WiredSet/Trendrr, encourages brands to enable an experience for a customer.  The value to the marketer is the emergence of the real-place web.  Whereas the real-time web gave marketers an understanding of how consumers interacted online, the real-place web offers an understanding of how people live their lives on the move.

So, how do media and entertainment companies leverage the real-place web to reach consumers? Well, I see two immediate possibilities.

The first is to trade sponsorship of Free WiFi or some other value-add in-venue service, for consumer input on everything from pilot episodes, to ad campaigns, to television commercials.  In other words, no need to bring the focus group in and feed them Smarties and popcorn.  Push the focus group out to the public and crowdsource the answers in exchange for something they want, in the place they’re already at.

The second is to go further down the road of gaming and/or product integration. This time however, we change the venue from the home to the place people are at – while out of home.

Several television shows have attempted over the last few years to engage fans on both the digital and broadcast channels simultaneously.   A recent example is the relationship between NBC’s Chuck and Subway.

When the show sat on the bubble for renewal, engaged fans stepped up through the show’s Fansite, Facebook and Twitter, asking them to buy a $5 dollar foot-long sub during the finale episode.

At one point, The Hollywood Reporter called Chuck the “most discussed bubble show online”

It worked, and the show was renewed with further support from Subway and others.

But, what if the drive to renew the show actually happened based on check-ins and/or mobile couponing at actual Subway stores?  The value to the advertiser would have likely been enormous in getting people to their stores and of course in driving incremental sales.

As a final thought, I come home to a Canadian icon in Tim Horton’s.  Now here is a company that is focused on one brand and one brand only – their own.  So how can a media company use the largest chain in Canada to connect with patrons of Tim Horton’s?

Give them what they already have.  On any given day, you can walk into a coffee shop and find copies of the Globe and Mail, National Post, Toronto Star, and the like all over the tables.  So why not embrace that?  Why not reward the natural synergy between a newspaper and our morning coffee, with free at home delivery subscriptions based on the number of check-ins at a coffee shop or gas station?

The opportunities for media and entertainment companies are limitless.  The real place web is here and together as consumers, technology providers, content producers and distributors, we must find ways to cross platforms and work together to embrace the power of LBS in engaging people at the right place in the right time.